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Last Update: 9 Hour and 36 Minute ago
News code: 28181
Published Date: Wednesday 4 September 2019 - 14:14:41
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UN: Nigeria must end violence claiming thousands of lives

UN: Nigeria must end violence claiming thousands of lives
World  - Nigeria is a pressure cooker of internal conflicts and generalised violence that must be addressed urgently, with issues like poverty and climate change adding to the crisis, says UN Special Rapporteur Agnes Callamard after visiting the country.

"Nigeria is confronting nationwide, regional and global pressures, such as population explosion, an increased number of people living in absolute poverty, climate change and desertification, and increasing proliferation of weapons. These are re-enforcing localised systems and country-wide patterns of violence, many of which are seemingly spinning out of control," the UN expert said.

Callamard highlighted issues of concern including the armed conflict against Boko Haram in the northeast, insecurity and violence in the northwest, the conflict in the central area known as the Middle Belt and parts of the northwest and south between nomadic Fulani herdsmen and indigenous farming communities, organised gangs or cults in the south, repression of minority and indigenous groups, killings in the course of evictions in slum areas, and widespread police brutality.

"I particularly urge the Nigerian Government, and the international community, to prioritise as a matter of urgency accountability and access to justice for all victims, and addressing the conflicts between nomadic cattle breeding and farming communities, fuelled by toxic narratives and the large availability of weapons," said Callamard.

"In almost all of the cases that were brought to my attention during the visit none of the perpetrators had been brought to justice. It is unfortunate that most of the findings made in this regard by the then Special Rapporteur in 2006 remain accurate.

During her mission, Callamard met Government officials and local authorities as well as family members whose relatives had been brutally killed, people forced to move from their homes (internally displaced persons), civil society organisations, and the UN. She visited Abuja, Maiduguri, Makurdi, Jos, Port Harcourt and Lagos.

 

News Code: 28181
Published Date: Wednesday 4 September 2019 - 14:14:41
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